Tag Archives: tftf

Overt Over Covert

Googlization is simply a fancier term for tactics that have been taking place for centuries- the collection of information about us. Vaidhyanathan argues in The Googlization of Us that the amount of information Google collects on each of us should be unsettling. We should have little worries about googlization , however, because the world is becoming more public each day, and googlization is close to necessary if you want the most out of your experience with Google. As Emily Nussbaum pointed out, “people who behave as if privacy doesn’t exist are actually the sane people, not the insane ones” (Googlization, p. 92).

The Truth of Fact, The Truth of Feeling revolved around the idea that advancements in technology might not be a good thing for civilization. In both side stories of the actual story, the protagonists realized that it wasn’t the technology that was dangerous but the way in which people used it. Imagine a world where Google didn’t promise to protect any of the information that we provided them with. That would be a scary reality to live in, and that would make this topic completely different. However, Google isn’t that kind of company, so we should have little to worry about. Just as you have to use Remem in TFTF religiously, by sacrificing some of your privacy, to receive the best outcome, you must use the settings that give you the most convenience with Google. There is no perfect world where you can have a secret life and receive the best that technology has to offer; as Mayer described, “it’s a trade-off, where you will give up some of your privacy in order to gain some functionality” (p. 87).

It’s obvious the direction that the world is heading, and we need to be pioneers instead of settlers. Google is not the enemy, and our information isn’t nearly as private as you might think, so there is no risk associated with googlization. There is no need for us to chop ourselves off at the knees by trying to maintain a “secretive” life. The policies that are in place today aren’t any need for concern since Google is a trustworthy company. If you refuse to allow googlization to enhance your life, then enjoy getting left behind society the next decade as the advancements will give us more opportunities than we can imagine.

Social Media is a Flash Drive

When social media was created,  the objective was lucid, but the mechanism by which it would be utilized was unclear. Most people would say it came into existence to facilitate social interaction and networking in its quickness and brevity, but after reading “The Truth of Fact, The Truth of Feeling,” I have come to recognize its capacity to serve as an external hard drive for memories. I tend to only post occasionally or on special occasions, and I try to keep my digital footprint very positive, boosting my reputation for any opportunities in the future. Looking back on my accomplishments will bring back pleasant feelings of nostalgia when I have a job and a family. However, this filtration of posts could cause a shift in my overall view of life. The positive posts remain, possibly leaving a falsely optimistic impression of the past and, by comparison, more negative connotation of the remaining memories not published to social media. The only way to combat this phenomenon is to internalize my memories accurately internally and externally, providing two ways to appreciate the past.

The population should be aware that social media is addictive and can dilute the feelings associated with memories. While the Internet is a great place to store information, this can lead to a decrease in the sentimentality of the information. When thoughts or events are digitized, the humanity of the moment has the possibility of disappearing from the person himself or herself. Some memories are made to be cherished internally, and if they are released to the world, memories can be tainted and lose their value.

TFTF Video response: Devan Sconzo

What does the story tell you about your own relationship with technology?

Post Video Reflection

It was not difficult to think about a topic to base my video on. The issue was choosing one topic to focus on because I felt like there were so many related reading topics I could have discussed. I considered using an anecdote of how I lost a camera I had when I was ten, then I found it again about 6 years later. I watched all of the videos with my family and it made all of us happy and it brought back so many memories we had naturally forgotten. I was going to use this example as to why Remem might be a good thing but ultimately decided against it.

There were many challenges in producing the video, even simple things such as camera placement. I was worried that it would look to much like I was reading off a script and tried to look into the camera as much as possible. I also wanted to keep a casual attitude so that viewers would feel comfortable when watching my video.

Ted Chiang Video Response

What does the story tell me about my own relationship with technology?

In my video, I focused on talking about whatever I could relate to in my life today. I decided to have an office setting with technology in the background to make me look more credible and knowledgable about the topic. I thought a lot about how I would present myself; thought the text was important, I realized that presentation can make a significant difference after taking a look at the two videos we analyzed in class. If I had more time to complete my video, I would think about filming different sections of it in different settings to enhance the individual effect of each section and transition better. Although a video is much more personal than a blog post and makes it much easier to target the audience emotionally, subtle aspects such as facial expressions and body language can alter the way the audience interprets the text altogether, which makes filming more difficult.