Tag Archives: Googlization

The Importance of Googlization

Google is the biggest company that specializes in collecting information, with billions of consumers each year. Using this information, Google creates tools and programs that greatly improve our lives, at least in most people’s perspective. In Siva Vaidhyanathan’s: “The Googlization of Us”, he argues that we should worry more about the information that Google collects from us, because it’s not always what is seems to be. Google takes our private information and can do whatever they please with it, which could cause that information to be exposed dangerously online. In theory, you could stop Google from collecting your information, but that would completely hinder your online experience, which is why Google set it up that way. I agree with Vaidhyanathan, that Google does not necessarily have the right to collect all this private information from people, however just like people adapted to the printing press and the automobile, we will learn to live with this accumulation of information. While we must adapt and accumulate to the “Googlization” of everything, it is becoming more and more important in our lives. In the reading by James Gleick: “The Information”, Gleick gives us a historical representation of the growth and importance of information. However, I believe that he also constantly argues that information is pushing mankind to a new level of thinking and globalization. Gleick states: “We are a half century further along now and can begin to see how vast the scale and how strong the effects of connectedness.” The “information age” that Gleick talks about is allowing humans to connect and grow more rapidly than ever before, and while we are still becoming accustomed to this new age, it will continue to increase and affect our lives every day. “Googliziation” may take away some of our privacy, like Vaidhyanathan argues, however it is also leading the way in the expansion of information, which will push our society to new levels of thinking and innovation.

 

Googlization

The article shows Google as this villain or bad guy. They say that Google “exploits” us and that it takes a “free ride”. One issue with this is that Google is not just a company but it is an accumulation of thousands of people working together. To more emphasis the multiple perspectives Google takes, employees are required to work on projects on their own that could not have corrupt input. This makes Google a diverse company trying to filter through as many ideas as possible without a strict goal to their research. This makes it next to impossible for Google to be a company that is trying to googlize everyone, but more a company that has found a way to provide great services go customer instead of charging the customer for the service they charge them for information and then sell that to companies.

Of those services that Google supplies are, maps, the search engine, mail, and many others. Just to go into one Google maps is a very useful service that allows you to get direction and give you an estimated time based on current traffic condition. It is also able to give you routs for public transportation and give you the time of the next train or bus. This example is to show that the services that Google provided would easily be worth a subscription package, but by Google recording our information they are able to make this service free.

Overt Over Covert

Googlization is simply a fancier term for tactics that have been taking place for centuries- the collection of information about us. Vaidhyanathan argues in The Googlization of Us that the amount of information Google collects on each of us should be unsettling. We should have little worries about googlization , however, because the world is becoming more public each day, and googlization is close to necessary if you want the most out of your experience with Google. As Emily Nussbaum pointed out, “people who behave as if privacy doesn’t exist are actually the sane people, not the insane ones” (Googlization, p. 92).

The Truth of Fact, The Truth of Feeling revolved around the idea that advancements in technology might not be a good thing for civilization. In both side stories of the actual story, the protagonists realized that it wasn’t the technology that was dangerous but the way in which people used it. Imagine a world where Google didn’t promise to protect any of the information that we provided them with. That would be a scary reality to live in, and that would make this topic completely different. However, Google isn’t that kind of company, so we should have little to worry about. Just as you have to use Remem in TFTF religiously, by sacrificing some of your privacy, to receive the best outcome, you must use the settings that give you the most convenience with Google. There is no perfect world where you can have a secret life and receive the best that technology has to offer; as Mayer described, “it’s a trade-off, where you will give up some of your privacy in order to gain some functionality” (p. 87).

It’s obvious the direction that the world is heading, and we need to be pioneers instead of settlers. Google is not the enemy, and our information isn’t nearly as private as you might think, so there is no risk associated with googlization. There is no need for us to chop ourselves off at the knees by trying to maintain a “secretive” life. The policies that are in place today aren’t any need for concern since Google is a trustworthy company. If you refuse to allow googlization to enhance your life, then enjoy getting left behind society the next decade as the advancements will give us more opportunities than we can imagine.