Tag Archives: Facebook

Facebook’s Critical Number: 140.3 Billion

Facebook-infographic-1-billion

Link: http://mashable.com/2012/10/05/the-most-important-facebook-number-140-billion/

Note: I was encountering problems scaling the picture to the screen, so you’ll probably have to go to the link to see the infographic in full size. In addition, this blog post tackles infographics in general.

I’ve found this infographic in several Internet blogs, and in several entries on Imgur and Pinterest, but I dug deep as possible to find the closest to original source from which this image comes. Seeing as how it is a Facebook infographic, and its source (Facebook Newsroom) is pointed out in the bottom left, as the reader I safely assume that these statistics were acquired from Facebook itself, and not just made up; I trust Facebook as being the credited source of the data. However, despite the credit I give to this infographic, it took over an hour of digging through the Web to find a source I felt was authentic, or the most trustworthy. Considering the length of time I spent searching, and the dozens of sources I checked for authenticity, I hold the conviction that infographics are unreliable display cases of information until an original source can be found.

For infographics in general, not just the aforementioned Facebook statistics, I feel they are an effective means of organizing and displaying data, but they themselves cannot quantify an argument; they require a blog poster, a web editor, or some other outside entity to bend the information held within towards a specific argument, goal, objective, or what have you. Furthermore, I lose trust in a website or blog that sporadically uses infographics without citing their source, as the creator/editor of the post may have just carelessly slapped the image into the text to make it more visually appealing, doing little to nothing good for the structure of the post or its argument.

To be blunt, infographics should not be trusted UNTIL a primary source can be identified and drawn upon. Simply finding one on the web and thinking to oneself “Hmm, this looks trustworthy” without bothering to look into the source(s) may prove to majorly mislead the reader.

Social Media Sites and Their Average Monthly Usage

social-engagement-infographic

http://www.askingsmarterquestions.com/infographic-google-social-engagement-falls-short/

This post does a great job showing the more important social media sites at first glance. The purpose of the infographic is to show how many minutes the average user spends on each site over a one month period. Facebook pops out the most just because of the size of its bubble and logo while others have smaller bubbles and take longer to be noticed. It took me several seconds to notice the Google+ bubble at the bottom. This picture’s authority comes from the The Wall Street Journal logo at the bottom right hand side of the frame. The Wall Street Journal is a well-known and well respected news source and adding it to the picture gives it more value. Also, the data was taken from the internet and compiled by comScore which gives the picture a little more authority.

The source of the infographic is an article about how little time Google+ users spend on the site. I actually did not expect this to be the focus of the article, but instead for it to be about how large the Facebook bubble is. The infographic conveys almost all of the information needed to come to the same conclusion as the author of the article. The article explains that Google released a statistic that Google+ has over 90 million users, and 60% of them are active daily. The infographic demonstrates the even if 60% of the users are active, they spend only a few seconds on the site at a time, probably coming from logging into one of Google’s many sites.

Why people use image to convey their ideas? – Andy Kim

Sometimes, images can have much bigger impact than mere words. Writings or words may be the best way to make direct or clear argument. Yet, images are often used as better tools in depicting an idea or thought more indirectly. As a matter of fact, greatest advantage of using image as a tool to convey an idea is its subtleness. Images are different from writing in its way of conveying the underlying theme. Images are able to give multiple interpretations and arguments, thus containing loads of information or idea in concise form.

The picture above is satire of social networking service. This picture directly shows how picture can contain an argument or a claim in so terse form. I bet that anyone can write at least more than a paragraph of the interpretation they have of this picture. The man in the monitor of a laptop signifies how people acts on social media. The red hairband and angry face of this man demonstrates that this man is fighting for some issue. It may be religious, political, or social. Whatever this man is fighting for, he seems intense and aggressive. Yet, the man below the laptop is clearly making contrasting behavior from the man above. This man is hiding in his coat, covering himself and trembling in fear. The picture overall, is mocking how people act overly sensitive in social media.

Of course, this single image can be interpreted in many ways, but I believe that it will have much better impact than its interpretation in words. Visualization of an idea or thoughts have unique power because it shows the non-obvious and speaks in indirect language. It may not be a good tool in making clear point, but it can give more authoritative and persuasive argument.

How your “Digital Life” will Affect your Future

I’ve provided a lot more information online than I think I have. Every picture, every post, every search, and every video you post is recorded to a database and can be accessed. Over time, you create a “digital life log” of yourself, which contains a history of your interactions online. This life log can be harmful if it falls into the wrong hands, however it can also have a positive effect on ones life. The ability to look back on your previous actions can provide an incentive to change and improve your life.

Facebook Timeline

(Facebook‘s Timeline)

An example of a common digital life log is Facebook’s new timeline feature, which allows users to look back to certain dates and see what they’ve posted.  This timeline creates a life log of pictures, status updates, and events that are specific to that user’s life. I have posts on my Facebook that date back to 2008.  I can look back on these posts and see how I was acting or what I was doing on certain days. Just by looking at my Facebook, I can see how much I’ve changed over the past couple of years. By looking back on how dumb I was in middle school, I can see how much I’ve matured since then.

I also enjoy being able to look back on all the great memories I have from high school on Facebook’s timeline. You can relive moments, and interact with friends and family who shared those moments with you. Researchers at UC San Diego and the University of Warwick found that Facebook updates are one and a half times more memorable than reading a book, and two and a half times more memorable than faces. This shows that Facebook users remember a lot of their posts and interactions on the timeline, which enhances their memory in the future. So instead of just looking back on updates and moments, Facebook is actually helping me to remember those great moments.

Digital life logs such as Facebook are becoming a reality in our everyday lives. These life logs help individuals gain a better understanding of their lives and even remember the moments they cherish. People should realize how valuable these technologies are in our lives, and use them to interact and grow.

 

Resources

https://www.facebook.com

http://www.businessnewsdaily.com/3757-facebook-effect-memory.html

Is memory-conserving technology only a good thing? – Andy Kim

Sometimes, I just want to go back to my past. Although I realize that all the sweet memory of the past is inflated, I cannot help it. But you cannot really live in your past again, and perhaps that is the key of its sweetness. Today, however, technology made it different. Taking out the memory of the past has become partially possible, thanks to the development of technology. Simplest way of doing so is just visiting your photo album. I frequently visit websites such as Facebook to recall the memory I had with my friends, loved ones, and family. I sometimes look at posts I uploaded years ago and remember how I was when I was young. Many times I feel that such methods are much better than merely recalling the past in my head. Technology has somewhat made possible of the idea of time-traveling by producing a way to visit the past in more lively and vivid ways. Yet, just like dynamites of Novel, the use of technology of taking out your past, unfortunately, have its side effects. In my home South Korea, there are tons of celebrities who were criticized harshly by the posts or videos they had uploaded before their debut. Everybody say or do something crazy when they are young. I also have memory that I want nobody to see. But since photo album or posts on the internet are semi-permanent, there are potential risks that others can find out your mistakes or action of the past. Posts and pictures that you upload right now can backfire you and be used in ways that you do not want it to be. Use of technology can be dangerous as it is sweet.